Tree Love

Help your tree thrive so it can provide shade, beauty and habitat, clean the air and water, and make our cities and towns healthier and more livable for decades to come.

Why Plant Trees?

Trees are constantly working for us. They clean our air and water, help us save energy, provide wildlife habitat, and increase our quality of life. They are a legacy we plant and leave for future generations. Learn more about how trees impact our community health and how you can bring the benefits of trees to your neighborhood.

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Take Action

Get involved in your own community to take action against the drought. There are so many ways to make a difference: create a DIY Mulch Party in your own neighborhood; start a NeighborWoods project; learn from the experts at a Drought Workshop; or visit the Save Our Water website for local information about water conservation and what you can do to help. » Learn More »

Quick Tips for Saving Water and Trees

Learn quick tips on saving water and trees.

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News See all

Tree Cheers for the City of Rancho Cordova!

In case you hadn’t noticed, March and April were busy, tree-filled months in Rancho Cordova!

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2017’s Big Day of Giving is 26 Days Away!

Watering Trees is Wise, Not Wasteful

How-To See all

Choose the Best Tree for your Space!

Find ideal trees for your space by searching our Shady Eighty database for tree characteristics you’re most interested in! We created a list of the very best trees for our region and now you can easily search our online database for trees that meet your needs. Happy planting!

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Care for your Roots

Roots work hard to keep your tree healthy, strong, and anchored into the ground. Learn how to care for your roots so they can thrive underground.

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Events See all

Save The Elms Program (STEP) Citizen Scientist Training

Sacramento Tree Foundation, Sacramento

Saturday, July 15 9:00A - 11:00A

Sacramento’s elm trees are disappearing! Join the Sacramento Tree Foundation and the City of Sacramento in monitoring our remaining public elms for the problematic Dutch elm disease (DED), a fungal disease with no known cure that has taken the lives of thousands of elms around Sacramento since the 1990s. DED-infected trees will be removed by the City to prevent the further spread of this unwelcome pest. This training will give you the knowledge, skills, and tools necessary to monitor elms for DED symptoms using your mobile device. STEP Citizen Scientists commit to monitoring selected elm trees three times between May and October.

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Sacramento: City of Trees? Addressing the Inequitable Distribution of our Region’s Urban Forest

West Sacramento Community Center, West Sacramento

Friday, July 28 8:30A - 10:30A

Recently, a new project launched by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) confirmed the long-held belief that Sacramento is the “City of Trees.” Using Google Maps’ street view data to measure tree cover in 17 cities around the globe, Sacramento was found to be number one in the United States and ranked third overall. While exciting news, there is still much work that needs to be done. Trees are integral to human health. People who reside in neighborhoods with more trees have lower rates of obesity, are more active, show lower levels of depression, and live longer lives. Unfortunately, the Sacramento Region suffers from stunning inequity when comparing the canopy cover of different neighborhoods, preventing many from reaping the benefits of our glorious canopy. Join us as we explore a brief history of Sacramento, highlighting the lack of investment in certain communities. Learn how urban greening dollars are working to build community engagement while expediting tree planting in under-canopied neighborhoods. Discuss how we can plan for the future, making sure that trees and green spaces are at the forefront during the design of new communities instead of merely an afterthought.

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