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New drought campaign aims to avoid repeat of deadly lesson

with Mike TeSelle, KCRA3

"The focus of the campaign is to educate the public that lawns can handle less water but that drought-stressed trees can be lost forever if they do not receive enough moisture."

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New drought motto: Stress lawn, save trees

by Debbie Arrington, Sacramento Digs Gardening

"Although they may turn brown or die back, lawns can cope with dry times and less water. But depriving trees of needed irrigation can cause irreparable harm."

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The drought is different this time. Everyone in the Sacramento region must conserve water

by Ralph Propper & Tom Gray, special to The Sacramento Bee

"You should also, however, be sure to efficiently water your trees. Many trees were lost in the last drought, an unintended casualty from reduced lawn watering. Let’s give them special care this time."

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Sacramento's elms need eyes -- yours

by Debbie Arrington, Sacramento Digs Gardening

"Consider this a neighborhood watch for favorite trees."

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Explore Outdoors: Sacramento urban forest offers trip around world through trees

with Mike TeSelle, KCRA3

"Capitol Park is a 40-acre forest of trees from all around the world that surrounds the state's Capitol building."

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Sacramento ranks among worst cities for ‘heat island’ neighborhoods. New study shows why

by Margo Rosenbaum and Alexandra Yoon-Hendricks, The Sacramento Bee

Sacramento is ranked in the top 20 worst cities in the country for “heat island” neighborhoods that are significantly hotter than their surrounding environment... The effects of extreme heat are especially prominent for historically underserved populations and people living in urban communities, according to the report.

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Sacramento’s tree canopy reflects the city’s inequities. How a $250 million plan could help

by Alexandra Yoon-Hendricks, The Sacramento Bee

"Sacramento is the so-called city of trees, but for many neighborhoods, that designation rings false. In some of the city’s wealthiest neighborhoods, lush tree canopies provide shade and improved air quality, while low- and moderate-income areas such as Meadowview, Del Paso Heights, Parkway and Valley Hi suffer in the scorching sun. A new bill introduced earlier this year by Rep. Doris Matsui, D-Sacramento, aims to change that."

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How to beat the heat and save money on energy

with Monica Coleman, ABC10

"Planting trees can help you keep a few bucks too. The Sacramento Tree Foundation says there is a 20-degree difference between a neighborhood with a tree canopy and one without. They also say planting a tree in your yard can help take the load off your A/C."

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